DWQA QuestionsCategory: QuestionsCPT2 deficiency – hydration, protein ingestion around workouts, nausea and vomiting, solcarb
D asked 2 years ago
Hi,
I have a LC-FAOD, and have a few questions regarding its management:

Hydration during exercise: Is it important to consume beverages with electrolytes, like Pedialyte or Gatorade around workouts, or should I be fine just water? Does the answer to that question depend on the duration of the workout? What about hydration during sick days?

Solcarb: Usually, for which reason are LC-FAOD patients taking this supplement? Can I use another quick carb of my choice, like a sugary drink instead?
Nausea and vomiting: In case of vomiting that could be due to gastroenteritis, are some LC-FAOD patients taking medication against nausea? Or would you advise against it (due to the risk of complications like sepsis), and instead risk rhabdomyolysis?

Does the timing really make a difference for protein ingestion around a workout? I have always been advised to consume it after a workout, but according to the International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN), an acute exercise stimulus, particularly resistance exercise, and protein ingestion both stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and are synergistic when protein consumption occurs before or after resistance exercise. If I can consume protein before a workout and not after, is there a specific time frame before the workout during which I should ingest protein (so that I do not slow down the absorption of carbs)?

Thank you so much for your help!

1 Answers
Keith McIntire answered 2 years ago

Thank you for the important questions below. I will answer them in segments as they relate to each of your concerns.
I have a LC-FAOD, and have a few questions regarding its management:
Hydration during exercise: Is it important to consume beverages with electrolytes, like Pedialyte or Gatorade around workouts, or should I be fine just water? Does the answer to that question depend on the duration of the workout? What about hydration during sick days?
A: If you are working out <60 min at moderate intensity, water is fine. You do not need electrolytes. For longer workouts or higher intensity, the electrolytes replace those lost with sweat and are absorbed with glucose. (Glucose and 2 Sodium molecules are absorbed across the gut via a SGLT2 co-transporter.)

Solcarb: Usually, for which reason are LC-FAOD patients taking this supplement? Can I use another quick carb of my choice, like a sugary drink instead?
A: Yes. I don’t think that you have to use Solcarb. Any quickly absorbed carb would be fine.

Nausea and vomiting: In case of vomiting that could be due to gastroenteritis, are some LC-FAOD patients taking medication against nausea? Or would you advise against it (due to the risk of complications like sepsis), and instead risk rhabdomyolysis?
A: I know some patients take medicine for nausea and it is safe. I’m not aware that anti-nausea medications increase the risk of rhabdomyolysis.

Does the timing really make a difference for protein ingestion around a workout? I have always been advised to consume it after a workout, but according to the International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN),
An acute exercise stimulus, particularly resistance exercise, and protein ingestion both stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and are synergistic when protein consumption occurs before or after resistance exercise. If I can consume protein before a workout and not after, is there a specific time frame before the workout during which I should ingest protein (so that I do not slow down the absorption of carbs)?
A: Protein intake after aerobic exercise (about 45 min post aerobic exercise) improves post exercise muscle protein synthesis and is preferred for repair of muscle after exercise and enhance glycogen synthesis.
For resistance training, I think easily digested protein before or after would be beneficial. I would target 45 min window- either before or after. The goal would be a 3:1 ratio of carbohydrate to protein. This should not inhibit carb absorption. I hope this helps you – Dr. Gillingham